9 Words Every Walker Should Know

You’ve probably gone for a walk and never thought further about calling it anything different. Or defined yourself in any other way than a walker. But in truth, there are many terms and words that define walking that just might open your eyes to the nuances that come with being a walker. Here are nine of our favorites.

  1. Hodophile. Does the thought of travel make you giddy? Are you ready to pack your bag at a moment’s notice? Feet feeling a little itchy if you’ve stayed in one place for too long? Then you might just be a hodophile, or a person who loves to travel. In case you can’t always get out of dodge, a long walk in a new location might do the trick.

  2. Nemophilist. You may be a nemophilist if you gravitate to spending time in or catching a glimpse of a forest. The scenery just may draw you in for a peaceful and rejuvenating walk.

  3. Coddiwomple. Just because you may not know where you’re going doesn’t mean you aren’t headed to where you need to be. It only means that you might be out on a coddiwomple, or traveling in a purposeful manner towards a vague destination. Just think of all the things you’ll discover along the way. 

  4. Solivagant. Getting out on your own, with only your thoughts to accompany you, can be just what you need to refocus and reset. So if you’re prone to solitary wandering, you may be a solivagant.  

  5. Awe. Ever looked at the height of a mountain or the vastness of the ocean and stood there in disbelief? You’re probably experiencing awe, a feeling of inspiration and reverence leading to wonder. It just may stop you in your tracks and call for a moment of pause.

  6. Wayfarer. The greatest miles are often covered by foot, and if you agree, you can call yourself a wayfarer. Traveling by foot allows you to take in so much more of your surroundings and truly see the beauty that you might miss in other forms of transportation.

  7. Petrichor. Ah, the sweet smell of rain, especially after a period of dryness, is a scent you can conjure in your mind in an instant. And now you’ll know as soon as you step outside to that unforgettable smell that it’s called petrichor. Maybe that’s why taking a walk in the rain is so appealing.

  8. Shinrin-yoku. The Japanese have long had a practice of experiencing the forest through all their senses. The sounds, the smells, the sensations, the sights are all a way to take in and make contact with the atmosphere of the forest, also known as forest bathing, or shinrin-yoku.

  9. Noctambulate. Fancy a stroll in the moonlight? If you are drawn to a walk after dark, you like to noctambulate. And, no need to do this with your eyes closed, it’s not just for the sleepwalkers in the group!

Next time you grab your Jetti Poles and set out for a walk, take a new term or two with you. Who knows, perhaps you’ll discover something about yourself that you never knew to spur you forward in your walking journey!